Results 1 to 3 of 3

Thread: Horse-Human Research: Interspecies "Co-Being" Goes Beyond Passive "Mirror" Theory

  1. #1
    Administrator
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    290

    Horse-Human Research: Interspecies "Co-Being" Goes Beyond Passive "Mirror" Theory

    http://www.thehorse.com/articles/329...ign=12-03-2013

    Norwegian and American researchers recently found that riders and horses can enter into a unique state of interspecies “co-being” with one other.

    The co-being theory goes beyond the recently described “mirror” theory that horses are “reflections” of their riders, Maurstad said. In co-being, riders “get to know their horses as personalities through ongoing processes of deep engagement,” she said. “They see horses as different personalities, both in the sense of horses being different personalities individually, and being different personalities from themselves, the humans. Riders do not see their horses as passive reflections of themselves.”

    The study, "Co-being and intra-action in horse–human relationships: a multi-species ethnography of be(com)ing human and be(com)ing horse," was published in August in Social Anthropology.

  2. #2
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Posts
    1
    I absolutely agree with deep engagement and will add that it is absolutely attainable on the ground as well. I refer the reader to The Carolyn Resnick Method which when practiced with a horse results in deep engagement - building relationships of love, cooperation, willingness, trust and communication. Horses' humans..."get to know their horses as personalities through ongoing processes of deep engagement,” she said. “They see horses as different personalities, both in the sense of horses being different personalities individually, and being different personalities from themselves..."
    I coach people with horses as my co-facilitators. Every horse I work with is different, has distinct a personality that I respect and depend on and clients seem to choose the horse that can give them just what they need. The aspect of the horse being a reflection is not passive at all. The emotional intelligence, high sensitivity to the energetic field - which is also an intuitive awareness - are inherent in the reflection. In this work, that the horse is knowingly reflecting is obvious. In a session, a horse responds appropriately to what is happening in the moment for the person the horse is working with. Often this is something the person is not aware of and because the horse senses it and responds, the person has the opportunity to experiences insight and immediate learning. I have witnessed incredibly intuitive and specific behavior by horses to a person's life experience. And I will add a short story - as a coach I am not always "on the ball" and in this situation I was talking too much, and feeling like I didn't know how to fix the mess I was making. At the moment of this thought, my horse coaching partner pushed me in between my shoulder blades (gently), I stepped out of the way, and he came in between me and our client. He and the client interacted resulting in the client getting just what she needed. So...reflection isn't necessarily passive but is very often an emotionally intelligent and intuitive response.

  3. #3
    Administrator
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    290
    I love your example, Mary.

    I once had a deep sadness developing in me over a situation. I went to help the farrier with trimming the horses, and each one of the four of them came up to me individually and sniffed me up - as if to say, "It is OK. We have this." I was SO touched by this that I released the sadness and believed them. It took a while, but it did indeed work out. It is an amazing memory to this day. How do they know?

    I love Carolyn's work and book. She and I grew up in similar ways around the horses so I really resonate with her approach.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •